ROK-U.S. News

Yonhap – Biden considers DMZ trip during upcoming visit to S. Korea: sources

By Song Sang-ho

SEOUL, May 17 (Yonhap) — U.S. President Joe Biden may visit the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two Koreas during his trip here later this week, as the allies are in consultations on his specific itinerary, informed sources said Tuesday.

Biden is set to arrive in Seoul on Friday, the eve of his first summit with President Yoon Suk-yeol. The DMZ, the heavily fortified inter-Korean border, is among the key sites that Biden could visit during his three-day stay, according to the sources.

The visit to the DMZ, if realized, could serve as a chance for Biden to get a better grasp of the reality of security on the Korean Peninsula and underline solidarity in the Seoul-Washington alliance amid concerns about the possibility of a North Korean nuclear test, observers said.

“Should Biden visit the DMZ, it could help ease concerns that the U.S., preoccupied with the Ukraine war, has been paying less attention to the situation on the peninsula,” Kim Tae-hyung, professor of political science at Soongsil University, said. “His DMZ visit could also be used to accentuate the strength of the bilateral alliance.”

This file photo, taken Dec. 7, 2013, shows U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (2nd from R) visiting the Demiliterized Zone separating the two Koreas. (Pool photo) (Yonhap)

This file photo, taken Dec. 7, 2013, shows U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (2nd from R) visiting the Demiliterized Zone separating the two Koreas. (Pool photo) (Yonhap)

Past U.S. presidents visited the DMZ during their trips to South Korea.

In 1983, then President Ronald Reagan traveled to the zone. A decade later, then President Bill Clinton also visited it. George W. Bush and Barack Obama made their high-profile visits to the zone in 2002 and 2012, respectively.

By far the most dramatic trip to the DMZ by an American president came in June 2019, when then President Donald Trump met with then South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in an historic trilateral encounter. Trump initially attempted to visit the DMZ aboard a helicopter in 2017, but the trip was canceled due to thick fog.

Biden himself toured the DMZ in his then capacity as the chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations in August 2001 and then as the vice president in December 2013.

While in South Korea, Biden could also visit Camp Humphreys, a sprawling U.S. military base in Pyeongtaek, 70 kilometers south of Seoul, to meet American service members and encourage them, observers said.

Following his trip here, Biden is set to fly to Japan to attend a Quadrilateral Security Dialogue (Quad) summit with the leaders of the other member nations: Australia, Japan and India.

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News articles do not necessarily reflect the views of KDVA. Any copyrighted materials depicted on this web site are presented for educational purposes only and no claim of ownership is made by KDVA.

Article: https://en.yna.co.kr/view/AEN20220517002700325?section=national/defense

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Yonhap – S. Korea, U.S. resume combined medical support exercise

SEOUL, May 13 (Yonhap) — South Korea and the United States held a combined medical support field training earlier this week after years of suspension caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the former’s Army said Friday.

The biannual exercise took place Wednesday and Thursday, with an aim to treat and transport casualties under a chemical warfare scenario, and enhance the allies’ interoperability, according to the Armed Forces Medical Command.

The U.S. Army’s 65th Medical Brigade and other medical units joined the exercise, mobilizing their key assets, including the KUH-1M, a variant of the KUH-1 Surion helicopter, the C-130 transport plane and the U.S. HH-60 choppers.

During the session, South Korean and U.S. service members practiced transporting wounded troops to Camp Humphreys, a key U.S. base in Pyeongtaek, 70 kilometers south of Seoul, by train.

South Korea and the U.S. launched the exercise, as they agreed in 2008 on the need for a combined field training on the transportation of troops injured in action. The exercise, however, did not take place in 2020 and last year due to COVID-19.

The resumption of the exercise came just a day after the inauguration of President Yoon Suk-yeol, who has vowed to cement the alliance and “normalize” the allies’ combined exercises.

Under the previous administration, Seoul and Washington had scaled down their major regular military exercises to help facilitate diplomacy with North Korea.

South Korean and U.S. service members participate in a field exercise in this undated file photo.

South Korean and U.S. service members participate in a field exercise in this undated file photo.

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News articles do not necessarily reflect the views of KDVA. Any copyrighted materials depicted on this web site are presented for educational purposes only and no claim of ownership is made by KDVA.

Article: https://en.yna.co.kr/view/AEN20220513008400325?section=national/defense

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Yonhap – U.S. Forces Korea congratulates Yoon on his inauguration

SEOUL, May 10 (Yonhap) — The U.S. Forces Korea (USFK) congratulated new South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol on his inauguration, stressing its commitment to maintaining “fight tonight” readiness against “any threat or adversary.”

In a Facebook post, the USFK issued the message as the South and the United States are stepping up defense cooperation amid concerns about the possibility of a North Korean nuclear test.

“Congratulations on officially becoming the 20th President of the Republic of Korea, Pres. Yoon Suk-yeol!,” the USFK wrote.

“We remain committed to providing a robust combined defensive posture and maintaining a high level of ‘fight tonight’ readiness to fulfill our obligation to protect and defend the ROK against any threat or adversary,” it added.

ROK stands for South Korea’s official name, Republic of Korea.

Earlier in the day, Yoon described the South Korea-U.S. alliance as a “linchpin” of regional peace and prosperity as he met with U.S. second gentleman Douglas Emhoff and other members of a U.S. delegation that attended his inauguration ceremony.

This photo, provided on April 7, 2022 by the U.S. Forces Korea, shows then President-elect Yoon Suk-yeol (C) meeting with South Korean and U.S. military personnel during a visit to Camp Humphreys, a key U.S. base in Pyeongtaek, 70 kilometers south of Seoul. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

This photo, provided on April 7, 2022 by the U.S. Forces Korea, shows then President-elect Yoon Suk-yeol (C) meeting with South Korean and U.S. military personnel during a visit to Camp Humphreys, a key U.S. base in Pyeongtaek, 70 kilometers south of Seoul. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

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News articles do not necessarily reflect the views of KDVA. Any copyrighted materials depicted on this web site are presented for educational purposes only and no claim of ownership is made by KDVA.

Article: https://en.yna.co.kr/view/AEN20220510011100325?section=national/defense

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(Yonhap Interview) S. Korea-U.S. alliance ‘nearly at its best’: outgoing defense chief

By Kang Yoon-seung

SEOUL, May 9 (Yonhap) — The military alliance between South Korea and the United States has reached “nearly its best level” over the recent years, outgoing Defense Minister Suh Wook said Monday, rejecting claims it has waned due to the Moon Jae-in administration’s drive for peace with North Korea.

In an exclusive interview with Yonhap News Agency, Suh pointed to the close-knit cooperation he has maintained with his counterpart, Lloyd Austin, and other U.S. defense officials as proof that the alliance remains robust at least from a military perspective.

Concerns have persisted about a possible weakening of the alliance as Seoul and Washington have scaled down their major regular military exercises to help facilitate diplomacy with the recalcitrant regime.

“I have long dealt with the alliance, and it has reached nearly its best level,” Suh said, noting that even the alliance partnership is not “100” percent free from small disagreements.

The interview took place on the eve of the inauguration of President-elect Yoon Suk-yeol, who has vowed to cement the alliance and “normalize” the allies’ combined exercises.

Suh rejected suggestions that under the Moon administration, the allies have suspended most of their major combined exercises.

“The number of small-scale training events below regiment levels has rather increased,” he said.

Noting a shift in the security situation on the Korean Peninsula, Suh said it is up to the next government to determine what to do with the allied exercises.

He was referring to the North’s suspension in March of a self-imposed moratorium on its nuclear and intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) tests, once seen as a major feat of Moon’s dovish approach to the North.

Defense Minister Suh Wook speaks during an interview with Yonhap News Agency on May 9, 2022, in this photo released by the Ministry of National Defense. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

Defense Minister Suh Wook speaks during an interview with Yonhap News Agency on May 9, 2022, in this photo released by the Ministry of National Defense. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

Suh also cited the possibility of the North continuing its provocative mode in the wake of its end to the moratorium.

“North Korea appears to be following its own timetable (on its weapons development) irrespective of the South’s political calendar,” the minister said. “But the North might take into account the presidential inauguration here and Biden’s planned visit to Seoul.”

U.S. President Joe Biden is scheduled to arrive in Seoul on May 20, the eve of the leaders’ first in-person summit.

Suh, who took office as the defense minister in September 2020, will be replaced by his successor, Lee Jong-sup, a retired three-star Army general. The National Assembly adopted a confirmation hearing report on Lee earlier in the day.

colin@yna.co.kr
(END)


Article: https://en.yna.co.kr/view/AEN20220509006500325?section=national/defense

News articles do not necessarily reflect the views of KDVA. Any copyrighted materials depicted on this web site are presented for educational purposes only and no claim of ownership is made by KDVA.

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Yonhap – S. Korea, U.S. begin combined drills involving F-35A stealth fighters

By Chae Yun-hwan and Song Sang-ho

SEOUL, May 9 (Yonhap) — South Korea and the United States on Monday kicked off their regular air force drills involving F-35A radar-evading fighters and other key assets, sources here said.

The two-week Korea Flying Training came on the eve of the inauguration of President-elect Yoon Suk-yeol, who has vowed to strengthen the alliance to counter North Korea’s evolving nuclear and missile threats.

The mobilization of the F-35A warplane appears to be the allies’ show of force against the North, following its launch of what was thought to be a long-range ballistic missile on Wednesday last week and an apparent submarine-launched ballistic missile three days later.

The size of this year’s training is similar to those of previous years, the sources said.

The training is a scaled-back version of the large-scale Max Thunder exercise that the two countries staged in the past with the massive mobilization of their air assets and service members.

This file photo, provided by the defense ministry, shows the South Korean Air Force's F-35A stealth fighters performing an elephant walk under the command of Defense Minister Suh Wook at an unidentified air base on March 25, 2022, to show the country's combat readiness following North Korea's intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) test the previous day. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

This file photo, provided by the defense ministry, shows the South Korean Air Force’s F-35A stealth fighters performing an elephant walk under the command of Defense Minister Suh Wook at an unidentified air base on March 25, 2022, to show the country’s combat readiness following North Korea’s intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) test the previous day. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

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KDVA Celebrates Its 5th Anniversary Month, May 2022

A Message from KDVA Chairman and President, General (Ret.) Vincent Brooks

KDVA is very thankful for our members, donors, partners, and supporters for enabling our mission to enhance the ROK-U.S. Alliance and support our Veterans.  KDVA is very proud of our members who continue to make a difference.  So, please join us in celebrating the people who built and support the Alliance, especially in 2022 under our theme of “We Are the Alliance.”

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The Korea Times – Marshall Plan for North Korea proposed as a big step for peace

Lawmakers, experts discuss ways to move ROK-US alliance forward to create conditions for reunification of two Koreas at 2022 International Forum on One Korea

By Kang Hyun-kyung

A nuclear-free North Korea has long been a policy vision that every South Korean president regardless of their political orientation has promised to pursue during their tenure.

It’s a shared, bipartisan, yet unfulfilled commitment, although no president has succeeded in actually denuclearizing North Korea. In fact, perhaps the opposite is true. While South Korea, with its democratic system, has had various leaders representing the two main political parties, with policies on the North that often zigzag back and forth with the change of administration, North Korea has had sufficient time to advance its missile and nuclear technologies to intimidate the world.

Now, denuclearization in North Korea seems distant, if not unrealistic.

With President-elect Yoon Suk-yeol’s inauguration coming on May 10, some experts, who gathered at a security roundtable held on Friday, called for resetting South Korea’s policy vision on the North by shifting its end goal from denuclearization to the reunification of the two Koreas in a manner that intends to benefit both. Some argued for the need for U.S.-led massive economic assistance equivalent to the U.S.-sponsored post World War II program, the Marshall Plan, which successfully helped the war-torn western and southern European economies recover, to persuade North Korea to join talks to build a shared, mutually-beneficial future for the peninsula.

Moon Hyun-jin, the founder of the Washington D.C.-based non-profit group, Global Peace Foundation, has ignited the discussion to advance South Korea-U.S. alliance to create the conditions for a unified Korea.

Moon, better known in the United States by his English name, Hyun-jin Preston Moon, encouraged President-elect Yoon to implement a durable policy for North Korea that can ultimately lead to peace on the Korean Peninsula.

“The United States and Republic of Korea to date have been piecemeal and reactive, with North Korea too often in the driver’s seat,” he said in a keynote speech for the “Congressional Roundtable and Forum on U.S.-ROK Alliance for Free and Unified Korea” held at Lotte Hotel in Seoul on Friday. “I have long advocated that it be replaced by a broad, forward-looking strategy focused on the end goal of a free and sovereign nation. A unified Korea that upholds fundamental human rights and values, should become the clearly stated and actively pursued policy of (South Korea’s) new Yoon administration, as well as of the U.S.’ allies and the United Nations.”

Rep. Lee Sang-min of the ruling Democratic Party of Korea, center in front row, and other participants gesture as they pose for a group photo at Lotte Hotel in Seoul, Friday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
Rep. Lee Sang-min of the ruling Democratic Party of Korea, center in front row, and other participants gesture as they pose for a group photo at Lotte Hotel in Seoul, Friday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk


The hybrid forum was held both online and in person. U.S. lawmakers, think tank analysts, Moon himself and some South Korean lawmakers participated in the event online via pre-recorded messages, while most of South Korea’s participants attended physically.

Moon noted that South Korea’s unification strategy must begin with the ideals that have motivated Korean people historically across the peninsula. “Their aspiration was to create a model nation, drawing upon a shared culture and identity that long predates the current division. In particular, it must look to Korea’s foundational philosophy of ‘Hongik Ingan,’ or ‘living for the benefit of all mankind,’ which aligns with the highest ideals of the principles of democracy,” he said. “I call this approach, the ‘Korean dream,’ and have explained it in my book with that title.”

Reunification of the two Koreas would require a complicated process and sophisticated diplomacy necessitating the full support from the United States and neighboring countries of South Korea, as was the case for Germany, which, as a formerly divided European nation, achieved unification following the collapse of the Berlin Wall on Nov. 9, 1989.

Some who are familiar with German affairs argue the reunification of Germany is the combined result of West Germany’s decades of policy consistency toward East Germany and the former’s active diplomatic efforts.

In South Korea, the unification discourse seems to have lost momentum currently as regional security has become more unstable than before, with some experts referring to the current global situation as raising concerns of a “new Cold War.”

Unstable geopolitics in East Asia, fueled mainly by North Korea’s incessant provocations and reliance on brinkmanship as well as the U.S.-China rivalry in the region, have complicated the discourse on the reunification of the two Koreas more than ever before.

In particular, clashes of the United States and China in many issue areas, not to mention the security of the region, have led to growing skepticism about the possibility of a unified Korea, as the United States and China are two of the countries whose full support for the reunification of the two Koreas matters.

Moon, however, stayed hopeful. “It is in the interests of the United States to take the lead in this effort,” he said. “Not only would a free and unified Korea diminish the nuclear threat to Korea, Japan and the United States; it will create, in effect, a new nation, which upholds liberty and democratic principles in a region where statist approaches are on the rise.”

Edwin Feulner, the founder and chairman emeritus of the Washington D.C.-based conservative think tank, Heritage Foundation, is seen on the screen as he delivers a speech for the hybrid event held both online and in person. U.S. Congress members, think tank researchers and Korean lawmakers participated in the event online. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
Edwin Feulner, the founder and chairman emeritus of the Washington D.C.-based conservative think tank, Heritage Foundation, is seen on the screen as he delivers a speech for the hybrid event held both online and in person. U.S. Congress members, think tank researchers and Korean lawmakers participated in the event online. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk

Edwin Fulner, the founder and chairman emeritus of the Washington D.C.-based conservative think tank, the Heritage Foundation, showed his full support for Moon’s vision for durable peace in East Asia, stressing the role of civil society as one of the core factors that could make Moon’s “Korean dream” happen.

“Advancing freedom and democracy cannot just be left to our governments: it is in fact the work of all of us, working through private organizations collectively, like the sponsors of this forum, to promote those values of freedom around the world,” he said.

Nicholas Eberstadt, the Wendt Chair of Political Economy at the Washington D.C.-based conservative think tank, the American Enterprise Institute, concurred with the idea of achieving a free and unified Korea, saying that the continued division of the Korean peninsula comes at “a very real price.”

“It is being paid every day by North Korea’s captive population. They suffer a human rights nightmare, an oppression exquisitely perfected under three generations of totalitarian rule by the Kim dynasty,” he said.

Eberstadt called on South Korean and U.S. officials and politicians to jump-start policy planning to help with North Korea’s smooth transition to a post-DPRK Korea. “Those who price the North Korean threat around zero may be making a fateful economic miscalculation. The longer unification is postponed, the greater the potential cost of that particular reckoning.”

On top of international support, there is another, more daunting task for South Korea and like-minded countries: persuading North Korea to join the discussion.

Speaking in a pre-recorded message to the roundtable, Rep. Lee Gwang-jae of the ruling Democratic Party of Korea (DPK) claimed that the ball is in the U.S.’ court, calling for a “Marshall Plan for North Korea.”

He underscored the “will of the United States” as being a critical factor to convince North Korea to join any such talks on reunification.

“I think the United States needs to have the will and determination to transform North Korea into a country like Vietnam,” he said. “Vietnam had a war with the United States in the past. Although Vietnam is close to China, their bilateral ties were once put to the test. Vietnam has introduced a socialist system but adopts some capitalist measures.”

Rep. Lee argued that South Korea, and probably the United States as well, need to be specific about a roadmap to make sure North Korea joins the multi-lateral discussion for the reunification of the two Koreas.

“We need to give them (North Korea) trust… I’m not saying that we should give them security assurance or vision for economic assistance ― such as a promise that South Korea would help the North achieve an economy with per capita income of $5,000 or something ― or both in return for their decision to denuclearize,” he said. “What I’m saying is that we need to be specific. We should assure them with a detailed plan that says clearly when, how and which countries will help them rehabilitate their economy. We need to prepare a Marshall Plan for North Korea.”

The 2022 International Forum on One Korea is the tenth such forum since it was first held in 2016. Friday’s event was co-hosted by five organizations, namely Action for Korea United, Global Peace Foundation, One Korea Foundation, Alliance for Korea United and Leaders’ Alliance for Korean Unification.

Consisting of two main events ― a Congressional roundtable and a forum among think tank experts of Korea and the United States ― lawmakers and experts shared their thoughts about the Korea-U.S. alliance and how it should adapt to the changing security environment of East Asia to achieve peace in the region through the reunification of the two Koreas.

Gen. Vincent Keith Brooks, a retired four-star U.S. army general and former commander in chief of Republic of Korea-United States Combined Forces Command, speaks online during the event. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
Gen. Vincent Keith Brooks, a retired four-star U.S. army general and former commander in chief of Republic of Korea-United States Combined Forces Command, speaks online during the event. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk

Article: https://m.koreatimes.co.kr/pages/article.asp?newsIdx=327924

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KDVA and KATUSA Veterans Association (KVA) Make Donation to Wall of Remembrance at Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC

KDVA and KATUSA Veterans Association (KVA) Make Donation to Wall of Remembrance at Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC

KDVA and our close partners, the KATUSA Veterans Association (KVA), made a donation of $50,000 to the Wall of Remembrance at the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC on April 15, 2022.  KATUSAs are Korean Augmentees to the U.S. Army, a program started by General Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War.  KATUSA Soldiers are selected to serve in the U.S. Eighth Army throughout Korea.

The Wall of Remembrance contains the names of 36,595 U.S. Service Members and 7,174 KATUSA Soldiers.

The donation ceremony took place at the Korean War Veterans Memorial.  General (Ret.) John Tilelli, Chairman of the Korean War Veterans Memorial Foundation (KWVMF), received the $50,000 donation from KDVA and KVA. KVA Chairman Kim, Hae-sung said, “I hope that the Wall of Remembrance can serve as a small token of our deep gratitude to repay the sacrifices of those who gave their lives to protect the freedom and democracy of Korea. We all know that Korea is a prosperous country today, and this proves that their sacrifice has not been in vain.”

General (Ret.) Vincent Brooks, KDVA Chairman and President, praised KVA’s strong efforts for the Alliance and Korea Veterans in South Korea and the United States.

At the KDVA and KVA donation ceremony for the Wall of Remembrance are (from left to right):  Mr. Sunny Park (KWVMF Board member and KDVA Advisor), General (Ret.) Vincent Brooks (KDVA Chairman and President), General (Ret.) John Tilelli (KWVMF Chairman), Mr. Yoon, Yoon-Soo (Chairman of FILA Holdings and Standing Advisor to KVA), Mr. Kim, Hae-Sung (Chairman of KVA), and Mr. Kim, Jong-Wook (Emeritus Chairman of KVA).

After the ceremony, KDVA hosted a lunch sponsored by KVA for ROK-U.S. Alliance leaders from the USG and ROKG, Veterans organizations, think tanks, the Korean-American community in the DC area, and journalists in the DC area. KDVA and KVA would like to thank all these supporters of the Alliance and Veterans who attended, including the First Lady of Maryland Yumi Hogan, a Military Mom of a Korea Defense Veteran.

Amb. Kathleen Stephens (KEI President and former U.S. Ambassador to South Korea) and General (Ret.) Vincent Brooks (KDVA Chairman and former Commander of UNC/CFC/USFK in Korea) at the KDVA and KVA Lunch on April 15, 2022.  Amb. Stephens provided inspiring remarks blending her personal story of Korea and her thoughts about the recent ROK Presidential election.


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Yonhap – Top S. Korean, U.S. military officers board U.S. aircraft carrier in East Sea

SEOUL, April 14 (Yonhap) — Top South Korean and U.S. military officers on Thursday boarded a U.S. nuclear-powered aircraft carrier sailing in the East Sea, sources said, in a rare move to highlight the allies’ unity amid concerns about possible North Korean provocations.

Seoul’s Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Won In-choul and Gen. Paul LaCamera, the head of the South Korea-U.S. Combined Forces Command, met aboard the USS Abraham Lincoln carrier that arrived in the waters earlier this week in a show of America’s military might.

Their symbolic meeting came amid speculation that the North could engage in provocative acts, like another intercontinental ballistic missile launch or a nuclear test, in time for its key political events, including the 110th birthday of its late national founder Kim Il-sung on Friday.

This photo from the Facebook page of the U.S. 7th Fleet shows the USS Abraham Lincoln aircraft carrier engaging in an exercise with Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force in the East Sea on April 12, 2022. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

This photo from the Facebook page of the U.S. 7th Fleet shows the USS Abraham Lincoln aircraft carrier engaging in an exercise with Japan’s Maritime Self-Defense Force in the East Sea on April 12, 2022. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

On Wednesday, the U.S. 7th Fleet showed photos depicting the USS Abraham Lincoln carrier, F-35Cs, an F/A-18E Super Hornet and E-2D Hawk Eye early warning aircraft engaging in the drills with Japan’s Maritime Self-Defense Force.

It marks the first such carrier maneuvers of the U.S. Navy in the East Sea since late 2017, when tensions soared due to a string of Pyongyang’s major provocations, including its sixth nuclear experiment.

In November 2017, the U.S. sent three flattops — USS Ronald Reagan, USS Nimitz and USS Theodore Roosevelt — to the East Sea operational area, called the Korea Theater of Operations (KTO), in an unprecedented display of force against North Korea.

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Article: https://en.yna.co.kr/view/AEN20220414011700325?section=national/defense

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KDVA proudly welcomes Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Jeanette. Edmunds to its Board of Directors

The Korea Defense Veterans Association (KDVA) proudly welcomes Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Jeanette (Jan) K. Edmunds to its Board of Directors. 주한미군전우회(KDVA)는 자넷 에드먼즈 (예) 소장님의 이사회 합류를 자랑스럽게 환영합니다.

General (Ret.) Vincent Brooks, KDVA Chairman and President, announced that, “General Edmunds is a longtime friend and supporter of the ROK-U.S. Alliance and our Veterans.  Jan has been a selfless servant for many causes. Jan has multiple tours of duty in Korea, including as a company commander and Commanding General of the 19th Theater Support Command in Daegu, Korea.  She brings a great perspective to the KDVA Board given her military journey and her corporate and non-profit experiences.  Jan will help KDVA realize our theme for 2022, ‘We Are the Alliance,’ because like all our members, she is the Alliance.  We are very fortunate that she has volunteered to join us!”

KDVA 이사장 및 회장이신 빈센트 브룩스 (예) 대장님은 다음과 같이 밝혔습니다: “에드먼즈 소장은 한미동맹과 우리 참전용사들의 오랜 친구이자 지지자입니다. 자넷 소장은 대구의 제 19 전구지원사령부의 중대장과 사령관으로서 역임했던 경험을 비롯하여 대한민국에서 다양한 복무경험을 가지고 있습니다. 그녀는 그녀의 군복무 경험 및 비영리단체와 협력했던 경험을 통해 KDVA 이사회에 훌륭한 관점을 제공할 것입니다. 자넷 소장은 2022년 주한미군전우회의 테마인 “우리가 한미동맹이다”를 실현하는데 조력할 것입니다. 왜냐하면 자넷 소장은 다른 모든 구성원들과 같이 그녀도 한미동맹이기 때문입니다. 우리는 그녀가 합류한 것을 매우 행운으로 여기고 있습니다!”

“I am very honored to join the Korea Defense Veterans Association and its Board of Directors,” said General Edmunds.  “When I look at this group of Koreans and Americans who make up the Association, I am so proud how we have come together to support the Alliance and the Veterans who fought in the Korean War and those Defense Veterans who have served since. My fondest memories of Korea were the generous, kind, and strong Korean people and the real-world mission against a dangerous threat.  I am very much looking forward to deepening my connections to Korea and helping our Alliance. Thank you sincerely for this opportunity to serve again.”

“주한미군전우회와 전우회 이사회에 합류하게 된 것을 영광으로 생각합니다”라며 (자넷) 애드먼즈 (예) 소장이 말했습니다. “이 단체를 구성하는 한미 양국의 사람들을 볼 때, 저는 한미동맹과 한국전쟁에서 싸운 참전용사들 그리고 전후 대한민국을 지키기 위해 복무했던 재향군인들을 지원하기 위해 함께 모였다는 것이 너무나 자랑스럽습니다. 제가 가장 아끼는 대한민국에 대한 기억을 얘기하자면 너그러운 인심을 가지고 있고 친절하면서도 강인한 한국인들과 위협에 맞선 현실속의 임무들이었습니다. 저는 한미동맹에 조력하고 대한민국과의 연대를 강화하기를 매우 고대하고 있습니다. 다시한번 이러한 역할을 맡을 기회를 주신 것에 진심으로 감사드립니다!”

Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Jan Edmunds commanded the 13th Corps Support Command, Fort Hood, Texas and the 19th Theater Support Command (TSC) in Daegu, South Korea. In both cases becoming the first woman General Officer to serve in those locations and commands. In her last assignment in Korea from 2002 to 2004 with the 19th TSC, General Edmunds was responsible for an organization made up of Active and Reserve Component soldiers, Department of the Army Civilians, Korean Nationals, KATUSAs, and Korean Service Corps personnel. The organization provided logistics support to U.S. Forces Korea (USFK) forward deployed across the peninsula. They provided command and control for six brigade-sized units as well as tactical control for force protection purposes of all units operating on U.S. Army bases in over 80% of the South Korean land mass. Her final assignment was as the Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff Logistics, Headquarters, Department of the Army.

자넷 에드먼즈 (예) 소장은 텍사스 주의 포트 후드(Fort Hood)에서 제 13 군단 지원사령부(13th ESC)와 대한민국 대구에 있는 제 19 전구 지원사령부(19th ESC)를 지휘하였습니다. 또한 두 경우 모두 각각의 사령부와 지역에서 지휘를 맡게된 최초의 여성 장성이었습니다. 대한민국에서 그녀의 마지막 복무였던 2002년부터 2004년까지 에드먼즈 소장은 19지원사에서 현역과 예비역 병력, 미 육군 군무원, 한국인, 카투사, 한국 근무단(Korean Service Corps, 미8군지원단) 인원들을 이끌었습니다. 19지원사의 주요 임무는 한반도 전역에 전개된 주한미군 부대들에 군수지원을 제공하는 것이었습니다. 19지원사는 또한 6개 여단급 부대에 대한 지휘통제, 그리고 대한민국 국토의 80% 면적에 걸쳐 소재한 주한미군기지의 모든 부대에 대해 기지방호차원에서 전술통제를 맡았습니다. 그녀의 마지막 보직은 미 육군성 본부 군수 참모부장이었습니다.

Since retiring, she has been consulting in the Defense and Aerospace industry. General Edmunds is currently the Board Chair for the Women In Military Service For America Memorial Foundation, and she served on several boards to include the Old Dominion University Research Foundation; Center for American Studies at Christopher Newport University; and Defense Science Board Task Force on Energy Systems for Forward and Remote Operating Bases.

전역이후 그녀는 미 국방 및 항공우주 산업에서 자문역할을 담당하였습니다. 에드먼즈 (예) 소장은 현재 미국 여군 기념재단의 회장이기도 하며 그녀는 올드 도미니언 대학교 연구재단, 크리스토퍼 뉴포트 대학 미국학 연구센터, 미 국방과학위원회 전방원격운용기지 에너지 체계 TF 등에서도 중역을 맡았습니다.

Please see her complete biography at https://kdva.vet/leadership/.

에드먼즈 (예) 소장의 약력은 https://kdva.vet/leadership/에서 확인하실 수 있습니다.


KDVA has built a reputation as a premier association that supports and advocates for the people who built the ROK-U.S. Alliance and continue to serve it in U.S. Forces Korea and Combined Forces Command.  KDVA is a 501C(3) non-profit organization incorporated in the state of Virginia.  Please contact KDVA at contact@kdva.vet, visit www.kdva.vet, and follow us on Facebook (@kdva.us) and Twitter (@KDVAvets).

주한미군전우회는 한미동맹을 탄생시키고, 유지를 위해 힘쓰는 이들을 지원하고 옹호하며 주한미군사령부와 한미연합사령부에서 복무하는 이들을 지지하는 최고의 협회로 명성을 쌓아왔습니다. 주한미군전우회는 버지니아 주에서 설립된 501C(3) 비영리 단체입니다. www.kdva.vet를 방문하여 contact@kdva.vet로 연락 주십시오. Facebook(@kdva.us) 및 Twitter(@KDVAvets)에서도 KDVA를 팔로우해주시기 바랍니다. 감사합니다.

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