ROK-U.S. News

Yonhap – S. Korea’s first military satellite successfully reaches orbit

SEOUL, July 31 (Yonhap) — South Korea’s first military communications satellite successfully reached its final position in the geostationary orbit Friday, 10 days after its liftoff, the arms procurement agency said.

The Anasis-II, launched last week from Florida atop a Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket manufactured by U.S commercial space firm SpaceX, arrived at the position in fixed orbit some 36,000 kilometers above the Earth at 7:11 a.m. (Korean time), according to the Defense Acquisition Program Administration.

The South Korean military will take over the system in October after the satellite manufacturer Airbus Defense and Space tests its functions and operability, the agency said.

With the successful launch of the Anasis-II satellite, South Korea has become 10th in the world to own a communications satellite for military purposes only.

The arms procurement agency said the satellite is expected to significantly boost the military’s capability to cope with network centric warfare, citing its increased transmission capacity and anti-jamming capabilities.

On the ground, the state-run Agency for Defense Development has been leading the project to develop eight different devices, including those that can be used on vehicles, to communicate with the Anasis-II.

The satellite will be put under the final operational assessment by the end of the year.

“We will put more effort into developing the related defense industry to gain the upper hand in space, which will become a new battlefield,” Wang Jung-hong, chief of the arms procurement agency, said.

A Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket carrying the Anasis-II satellite, South Korea's first military communications satellite, lifts off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 20, 2020, in this photo released by the Defense Acquisition Program Administration. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

A Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket carrying the Anasis-II satellite, South Korea’s first military communications satellite, lifts off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 20, 2020, in this photo released by the Defense Acquisition Program Administration. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

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Yonhap – 7 Korean War veterans laid to rest 7 decades after outbreak of conflict

SEOUL, July 29 (Yonhap) — The remains of seven soldiers killed in North Korea during the 1950-53 Korean War were buried at a national cemetery Wednesday, following their return home, 70 years after the outbreak of the conflict, the Army said.

A burial ceremony took place at Daejeon National Cemetery, 160 kilometers south of Seoul, presided over by Army Chief of Staff Gen. Suh Wook, according to the military.

The seven veterans are among 147 South Korean warriors whose remains were repatriated from North Korea via Hawaii last month.

They are all presumed to have died in December 1950 near the Changjin Lake in South Hamgyong Province, one of major Korean War battle zones in the communist state.

“The seven heroes answered the call to defend the country and sacrificed themselves for freedom and peace. The prosperity South Korea and we enjoy today were possible thanks to them,” Suh said during the ceremony. “Carrying on their patriotism and military spirit, we will steadfastly preserve peace in South Korea.”

Around 140,000 South Korean troops were killed in action, and some 450,000 others were injured during the three-year war. The number of fallen South Korean troops whose remains have yet to be recovered stands at around 123,000.

A burial ceremony is under way at Daejeon National Cemetery, 160 kilometers south of Seoul, on July 29, 2020, for seven soldiers killed in North Korea during the 1950-53 Korean War. They are among 147 South Korean warriors whose remains returned home from the North via Hawaii the previous month, 70 years after the outbreak of the conflict. (Yonhap)

A burial ceremony is under way at Daejeon National Cemetery, 160 kilometers south of Seoul, on July 29, 2020, for seven soldiers killed in North Korea during the 1950-53 Korean War. They are among 147 South Korean warriors whose remains returned home from the North via Hawaii the previous month, 70 years after the outbreak of the conflict. (Yonhap)

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Yonhap – UNC chief reaffirms ‘unwavering’ commitment to peace on peninsula amid ‘uncertainty’

By Choi Soo-hyang

SEOUL/PANMUNJOM, July 27 (Joint Press Corps-Yonhap) — United Nations Command (UNC) Commander Gen. Robert Abrams said Monday the command remains “unwavering” in its commitment to peace on the Korean Peninsula as he marked the 67th anniversary of the signing of the 1950-53 Korean War armistice agreement.

Abrams made the pledge during a ceremony at the inter-Korean truce village of Panmunjom to mark the anniversary amid chilled relations between the two Koreas and little progress in nuclear talks between the United States and the North.

“Last year on this day, when I stood before you right here at the Freedom House, there was an air of cautious optimism as the world witnessed a significant and palpable reduction of tensions between North and South Korea,” he said. “Today, this cautious optimism has shifted somewhat to an air of uncertainty.”

Still, lasting peace remains the command’s “earnest goal,” Abrams said, adding that it is the responsibility of the command to enforce the armistice until that goal is achieved.

Established in 1950 under a U.N. mandate in response to North Korea’s military provocations, the U.S.-led UNC has played a role as the enforcer of the armistice agreement that halted the 1950-53 Korean War. The two Koreas are still technically at war, as the conflict ended in a truce, not a peace treaty.

“UNC’s commitment to this goal, 67 years later, is unwavering,” the U.S. general said. “Today we reaffirm our commitment to the principles that banded our forebears together.”

Maj. Gen. Kang In-soon, the chief delegate of the UNC Military Armistice Commission (UNCMAC), said challenges remain in the journey to build peace on the peninsula, citing Pyongyang’s recent destruction of the inter-Korean liaison office in the North’s border town of Kaesong.

“But I am sure that this crisis and challenge will turn into an opportunity if we continue our efforts to build a lasting peace,” he said, expressing gratitude to all members of the command for their efforts to enforce the armistice.

From left are United Nations Command (UNC) Commander Gen. Robert Abrams; Maj. Gen. Hibbe Corneliusson, the Swedish member of the Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission; Brigadier Michael Murdoch, U.K. member of the UNC Military Armistice Commission (UNCMAC); and Maj. Gen. Kang In-soon, the chief delegate of the UNCMAC, at a ceremony at the inter-Korean truce village of Panmunjom to mark the 67th anniversary of the signing of the armistice for the 1950-53 Korean War on July 27, 2020. (pool photo) (Yonhap)

From left are United Nations Command (UNC) Commander Gen. Robert Abrams; Maj. Gen. Hibbe Corneliusson, the Swedish member of the Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission; Brigadier Michael Murdoch, U.K. member of the UNC Military Armistice Commission (UNCMAC); and Maj. Gen. Kang In-soon, the chief delegate of the UNCMAC, at a ceremony at the inter-Korean truce village of Panmunjom to mark the 67th anniversary of the signing of the armistice for the 1950-53 Korean War on July 27, 2020. (pool photo) (Yonhap)

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Yonhap – S. Korea sees ‘high chances’ of defector’s border crossing into N. Korea

By Choi Soo-hyang

SEOUL, July 26 (Yonhap) — South Korea sees “high chances” of an individual’s alleged illegal border crossing into North Korea, a military official said Sunday after Pyongyang claimed that a defector with suspected virus symptoms recently crossed the demarcation line to return home.

“The military is looking into the detailed routes, seeing high chances of a certain individual’s border crossing into the North,” the official said. “Regarding the North’s media report, our military has specified some people and is verifying facts in close collaboration with related agencies.”

The Joint Chiefs of Staff is reviewing the military’s overall readiness posture, including its monitoring equipment and recorded video clips, he said.

The North’s official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) said earlier in the day that leader Kim Jong-un convened an emergency politburo meeting of the ruling Workers’ Party and adopted the “maximum emergency system” against the coronavirus after a defector returned home with suspected COVID-19 symptoms.

“An emergency event happened in Kaesong City where a runaway who went to the South three years ago, a person who is suspected to have been infected with the vicious virus, returned on July 19 after illegally crossing the demarcation line,” the report said.

Authorities are known to be looking into a 24-year-old resident in Gimpo, west of Seoul, based on the KCNA report that the person had fled the North in 2017.

The defector, surnamed Kim, is known to be currently out of contact. He has been under police investigation over suspicions of raping a female defector last month.

Kim reportedly fled to the South by swimming, and the possibility is high that he swam back to the North, instead of using land routes, such as through the heavily fortified military demarcation line separating the two Koreas.

North Korean defectors usually receive three months of resettlement education upon their arrival to the South and are put under the support and management of the police for a five-year protection period. But it is known to be practically difficult to follow their movements in real time considering the large number of defectors in the country.

The latest incident is expected to bring the military under fire again, as it has already faced intense public criticism for a series of security breaches highlighting lax discipline.

The military pledged a watertight posture last year after a wooden boat carrying four North Koreans arrived at a South Korean port on the east coast without being detected.

(3rd LD) S. Korea sees 'high chances' of defector's border crossing into N. Korea - 1
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Yonhap – United Nations Command launches official website

SEOUL, July 27 (Yonhap) — The United Nations Command (UNC) launched an official website as it marked the 70th anniversary of its establishment, officials said, in a move seen as part of the U.S.-led entity’s push to strengthen its presence and roles on the Korean Peninsula.

The website, http://www.unc.mil, introduces its mission, multilateral contributors, history and roles “in preserving security, stability and enduring peace on the Korean Peninsula,” UNC said on its Facebook page on Friday.

The UNC had previously shared the website with U.S. Forces Korea.

The UNC was established on July 24, 1950, upon the outbreak of the Korean War, as the world’s first unified command structure, to command the multinational military forces supporting South Korea. Since the Armistice Agreement that halted the three-year war, the UNC has been in charge of enforcing the agreement.

The UNC has taken various measures under a revitalization campaign in recent years, such as having more officials exclusively dedicated to UNC roles, rather than taking multiple responsibilities for USFK or the South Korea-U.S. Combined Forces Command.

This screen grab, taken on July 27, 2020, shows the front page of the United Nations Command's official website captured. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

This screen grab, taken on July 27, 2020, shows the front page of the United Nations Command’s official website captured. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

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Article: https://en.yna.co.kr/view/AEN20200727001900325?section=national/defense

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Yonhap – S. Korea allows UNC to use border building for armistice event

SEOUL, July 23 (Yonhap) — Reversing its earlier decision, South Korea has allowed the United Nations Command (UNC) to hold an armistice anniversary ceremony at its building on the inter-Korean border next week, according to officials Thursday.

The unification ministry has approved the UNC to use the Freedom House building located in the border village of Panmunjom for next Monday’s event marking the 67th anniversary of the signing of the 1953 Korean War armistice agreement.

“The improving COVID-19 situation in the Seoul metropolitan area and weather conditions were taken into consideration,” a ministry official explained.

Earlier this week, the ministry rejected the UNC’s request to hold the annual ceremony at the Freedom House, citing the new coronavirus and recent inter-Korean developments.

The UNC reportedly considered holding the event on the road in front of the building.

Speculations were raised that the disapproval might have had something to do with the UNC’s rejection in 2018 of Seoul’s request to access the Military Demarcation Line for a joint railway field survey by the two Koreas.

Since 2013, the UNC has held the event at the building.

The U.S.-led command administers Panmunjom and the broader Demilitarized Zone and enforces the armistice that halted the 1950-53 Korean War.

The four-story Freedom House building was constructed in 1998 and has been used for communications with North Korea. It is managed by the South Korean government.

This file photo shows U.S. Gen. Robert Abrams, head of the United Nations Command, speaking at an event marking the 66th anniversary of the signing of the 1950-53 Korean War armistice agreement, at the Freedom House in the inter-Korean border village of Panmunjom on July 27, 2020. (Joint Press Corps)

This file photo shows U.S. Gen. Robert Abrams, head of the United Nations Command, speaking at an event marking the 66th anniversary of the signing of the 1950-53 Korean War armistice agreement, at the Freedom House in the inter-Korean border village of Panmunjom on July 27, 2020. (Joint Press Corps)

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Yonhap – N.K. could react positively if S. Korea, U.S. exercise flexibility on joint drills: minister nominee

By Koh Byung-joon

SEOUL, July 23 (Yonhap) — North Korea could respond if South Korea and the United States exercise flexibility on their summertime joint military exercises as it could be seen as a “new message” for Pyongyang, unification minister nominee Lee In-young said Thursday.

Lee made the remarks during a parliamentary confirmation hearing as military authorities of South Korea and the U.S. are in discussion on whether to scale back or call off a major combined exercise reportedly scheduled for next month amid the global coronavirus pandemic.

“Should we exercise flexibility, such as downsizing the scale by around half or moving maneuver areas south of the Han River, North Korea could respond accordingly,” Lee said when asked about what impact such drills would have on inter-Korean relations.

“If the exercises go ahead as scheduled, North Korea’s protest will be a little stronger, whereas if the exercises are put on hold altogether, it could be seen as a new message,” he said.

North Korea has long denounced joint military drills between the U.S. and the South as a rehearsal for invasion. When and how to stage the annual summertime exercises have drawn keen attention as they could throw cold water on already chilled inter-Korean relations.

Lee, known for pro-unification activism during his college years when he served as the inaugural leader of a nationwide university students’ association, also said he believes it is right for the U.S. to continue to station troops in the South.

Lee said the American troop presence is necessary in the context of power balance in Northeast Asia.

Lee also called on North Korean leader Kim Jong-un to step forward to improve relations with the U.S. even if his demands are not perfectly met.

“To be honest, I would like to propose to North Korea to improve relations with the U.S., even if it takes home 70 to 80 percent and not 100 percent,” he said.

“If we miss this opportunity, we will miss the strategic timing or the ‘golden time,’ and it will take a long time before we are given the next opportunity,” he added.

He also urged for a cautious approach to claiming damages from the North for the demolition of the joint liaison office, stressing the importance of “a wise solution” to avoid hindering inter-Korean relations.

Unification Minister nominee Lee In-young speaks during his parliamentary confirmation hearing at the National Assembly in Seoul on July 23, 2020. (Yonhap)

Unification Minister nominee Lee In-young speaks during his parliamentary confirmation hearing at the National Assembly in Seoul on July 23, 2020. (Yonhap)

Inter-Korean relations have been deadlocked since the no-deal summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in February last year. Pyongyang has not responded to Seoul’s offer for exchanges and talks ever since.

Cross-border ties have become further strained since the North blew up a joint liaison office in its border town of Kaesong last month in anger over anti-Pyongyang leaflets sent by activists in South Korea

The North also cut off all cross-border communication lines and threatened to take more retaliatory steps, but leader Kim later called off military action against the South.

With regard to the issue of the withdrawal of U.S. troops stationed in South Korea, Lee said that it is necessary to maintain their presence here from the perspectives of “strategic balance of power” in the region and alliance between Seoul and Washington.

A recent news report said that the Pentagon had presented the White House with options to reduce troop levels in South Korea in March. Speculation of a possible drawdown has increased as the U.S. has demanded South Korea pay significantly more to keep the 28,500 troops stationed there.

Lee stressed that inter-Korean relations should move forward regardless of progress in denuclearization talks between North Korea and the U.S., vowing to push for a “bold change” in Seoul’s approach to North Korea if he takes office.

“The South and the North should sit face-to-face again. Reaffirming their mutual trust and making good on promises, they have to restart the stopped Korean Peninsula clock,” he added. “We will take the lead and push for a bold change to turn the North Korea-U.S. clock into the clock for the South and the North.”

He, in particular, called for cross-border cooperation in the humanitarian area, saying issues related to “eating, suffering and things that people want to see before they die” should be handled independently of political issues.

If necessary to help break the logjam in relations with the North, Lee also said that he would not hesitate at all to go to Pyongyang as a special envoy.

“I would like to resume talks, among other things,” he said.

He, however, dismissed calls for disbandment of the working group forum set up in September 2018 to coordinate North Korea policy with the U.S. Critics here and North Korea have denounced it as a major hindrance to expanding inter-Korean exchanges as it focuses only on enforcement of global sanctions on the North.

“We cannot completely deny the function that the working group has played in effectively resolving matters related to sanctions against the North,” he said.

Lee, a four-term lawmaker, was appointed as unification minister earlier this month to replace Kim Yeon-chul, who resigned over recently strained inter-Korean relations.

He must go through a parliamentary confirmation hearing, but it is considered largely a formality as the National Assembly can only express its views on the nomination without the power to reject it.

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Yonhap – Top envoys of U.S., China hold talks

By Kim Seung-yeon

SEOUL, July 22 (Yonhap) — The ambassadors of the United States and China to South Korea met one-on-one Wednesday and discussed the two countries’ bilateral relations and other issues, embassy officials said.

The meeting between Ambassadors Harry Harris and Xing Haiming took place at the U.S. envoy’s residence in central Seoul earlier in the day, an embassy official said. The meeting lasted for about an hour.

Harris later tweeted about their meeting, along with a selfie they took together — with broad smiles.

“Good meeting with PRC Ambassador to ROK, H.E. Xing Haiming. We discussed the important USA-PRC relationship,” Harris wrote, referring to China and South Korea by the acronyms of the countries’ official names: the People’s Republic of China and the Republic of Korea.

It was their first one-on-one meeting since Xing took office in late January.

“Ambassador Harris commented afterward that he enjoyed the productive discussion with Ambassador Xing on a broad range of diplomatic issues,” a U.S. Embassy spokesperson said on the customary condition of anonymity.

According to a statement on the website of the Chinese Embassy in Seoul, Xing said the stable development of the Sino-U.S. relations not only serves the fundamental interests of China and the U.S. but is also the “common hope of the people of the world.”

Xing added that China has “no intention of replacing the U.S.” while voicing hope that the U.S. will respect China’s “core interests.”

Harris expressed Washington’s hope for the strengthening of cooperation with Beijing on the Korean Peninsula issue, the Chinese Embassy said.

A spokesperson from the Chinese Embassy said the meeting came as a courtesy call by Xing, who became the ambassador to South Korea early this year, and they discussed various issues, including topics of mutual concern.

U.S. and Chinese ambassadors to South Korea -- Harry Harris (R) and Xing Haiming -- pose for a selfie during their talks at Harris' residence in central Seoul on July 22, 2020, in this photo captured from Harris' Twitter post. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

U.S. and Chinese ambassadors to South Korea — Harry Harris (R) and Xing Haiming — pose for a selfie during their talks at Harris’ residence in central Seoul on July 22, 2020, in this photo captured from Harris’ Twitter post. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

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Military.com – US Military Eyes Changes to Troop Presence in South Korea

In this March 25, 2015, file photo, U.S. Army soldiers from the 25th Infantry Division's 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team and South Korean soldiers take their position during a demonstration of the combined arms live-fire exercise as a part of the annual joint military exercise Foal Eagle between South Korea and the United States at the Rodriquez Multi-Purpose Range Complex in Pocheon, north of Seoul, South Korea. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)
In this March 25, 2015, file photo, U.S. Army soldiers from the 25th Infantry Division’s 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team and South Korean soldiers take their position during a demonstration of the combined arms live-fire exercise as a part of the annual joint military exercise Foal Eagle between South Korea and the United States at the Rodriquez Multi-Purpose Range Complex in Pocheon, north of Seoul, South Korea. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

The U.S. has no immediate plans for troop withdrawals from South Korea, but all commands have been directed to rely more on rotational forces, Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Tuesday.

“I’ve issued no orders to withdraw forces from Korea,” he said, “but we will continue to look at adjustments at every command we have in every theater to make sure we are optimizing our forces.”

Esper said the goal is to rely more on rotational rather than fixed deployments to give the U.S. “greater strategic flexibility” in responding to global challenges from China and Russia.

He did not directly address recent reports, first from The Wall Street Journal, that the Pentagon has drawn up options for reducing the current total of 28,500 U.S. troops on the peninsula.

The reports of possible withdrawals rattled the Seoul government, coming as they did after President Donald Trump’s June announcement of his intention to withdraw 9,500 of the 34,500 U.S. troops now stationed in Germany.

Esper spoke from the Pentagon in a webinar hosted by the International Institute of Strategic Studies in London on security issues in the Indo-Pacific region.

In a Pentagon briefing later Tuesday, Jonathan Hoffman, the chief Defense Department spokesman, confirmed that the DoD is taking an overall look at “whether we are properly supporting the missions we’ve been given” by the White House and Congress in South Korea and elsewhere.

“We’ll have recommendations we may make in the future,” he said on the positioning of forces.

The U.S.-South Korea alliance has also come under strain in the dispute over how much Seoul should contribute to maintain the U.S. troop presence. South Korea now pays about $900 million annually, but the Trump administration has demanded a major increase.

In an April 20 White House news conference, Trump said, “They’ve offered us a certain amount of money, and I’ve rejected it. We have to be treated equitably and fairly, and so that’s where it is right now. And what’s going to happen, I can’t tell you.”

In his earlier remarks in the webinar, Esper focused mainly on what he called a “catalog of bad behavior” by China but added that he plans to visit that nation later this year.

Esper said that the U.S. will continue to sell arms to Taiwan and send warships through the Taiwan Straits as a warning against increasing threats from Beijing to attack should Taiwan move to declare full independence from the mainland.

In a May 29 speech in Beijing’s Great Hall of the People, Li Zuocheng, a member of the Central Military Commission, said China’s forces would “take all necessary steps to resolutely smash any separatist plots or actions.”

Esper also noted that China’s People’s Liberation Army has significantly increased missile forces on the mainland side of the Taiwan Straits.

China has “hundreds, if not over a thousand, missiles aimed at Taiwan, and we’ve seen [President Xi Jinping] and his party really take this to a new level,” he said. “So we remain committed to regional peace and security. We will live up to our commitments to Taiwan, which is all in the interest of a secure and stable region.”

In the South China Sea, China is “regularly disrespecting the rights of other nations” with its territorial claims and military buildup on reefs and artificial islands, actions that have put the intentions of the Chinese Communist Party “on full display for all to see,” Esper said.

The U.S. will continue to oppose China’s “maritime empire” in the South China Sea with more Freedom of Navigation Operations and closer cooperation with allies, he added.

— Richard Sisk can be reached at Richard.Sisk@Military.com.


Article: https://www.military.com/daily-news/2020/07/21/us-military-eyes-changes-troop-presence-south-korea.html?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=EBB%2007.22.20&utm_term=Editorial%20-%20Early%20Bird%20Brief

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Stars & Stripes – Esper says no orders have been issued to withdraw troops from South Korea

By CAITLIN M. KENNEY | STARS AND STRIPES

WASHINGTON — Defense Secretary Mark Esper on Tuesday dismissed reports that he was developing plans to reduce the number of American troops in South Korea.

“I’ve issued no orders to withdraw forces in the Korean Peninsula,” Esper said during a virtual discussion with The International Institute for Strategic Studies, a think tank.

The Wall Street Journal reported Friday that the Pentagon had presented options to the White House for drawing down the number of military personnel on the peninsula because of the ongoing disagreement between the two countries over how much South Korea should pay to offset the cost of having American troops stationed in the country.

President Donald Trump had demanded a fivefold increase to about $5 billion per year, though U.S. negotiators have said they reduced that demand to an unannounced amount.

The previous Special Measures Agreement expired Dec. 31. In April, U.S. Forces Korea, which commands some 28,500 service members on the divided peninsula, furloughed about 4,500 South Korean employees, about half the local national workforce, because there is no agreement.

The United States and South Korea are still negotiating for a new agreement.

However, Esper also said Tuesday that the Pentagon is still implementing the National Defense Strategy. That has meant looking at the geographic combatant commands and making sure the United States is positioned well to accomplish its mission, he said. That includes looking at adjustments “to make sure we are optimizing our forces.”

“We’re moving toward additional concepts, new concepts such as dynamic force employment. And I continue to want to pursue more rotational forces — force deployments into theaters, because it gives us, the United States, greater strategic flexibility in terms of responding to challenges around the globe,” Esper said.

The threat of withdrawing U.S. troops stationed overseas has also cast a shadow over the alliance with Germany, where 34,500 troops are stationed. Trump plans to move 9,500 troops from Germany and relocate them to other European countries or back to the United States.

Trump has said he wants to cut troops in Germany because the country does not invest enough in defense and takes advantage of the United States on trade.

Kenney.Caitlin@stripes.com
Twitter: @caitlinmkenney


Article: https://www.stripes.com/news/pacific/esper-says-no-orders-have-been-issued-to-withdraw-troops-from-south-korea-1.638291?fbclid=IwAR3R9Nf89CX1qQ1YbP4S9zSC-jaqXElgXXk51dnDdPaT93CldxZlFF7GgJ8

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